Monday, February 10, 2014

What is a Hybrid Author?

What is the creature referred to as a "hybrid author?" Are they beings spliced together genetically or perhaps some liger-jumbling-of-authors?

Those answers are very imaginative, to be sure, but it's actually quite simple. A hybrid author is an author that has published through or is publishing through traditional and Indie paths.
For example, meet Elana Johnson, young adult author of the Possession series published by Simon and Schuster (part of the Big 6 - er - 5 - or whatever it is now). She is about to release a new book, titled ELEVATED, on February 18th. This book is one she is self-publishing. So she falls under the definition of hybrid author.

Susan Kaye Quinn is another great example of a hybrid author. She first published with Omnific Publishing but has since made her mark in the sci-fi world with her breakout Mindjack novels and future-noir Debt Collector serial. She's not one to let genre be a stumbling block either. She's also published a Bollypunk thrill-read and a middle grade fantasy.

Indie Romance Convention's 2014 Mistress of Ceremony, Victoria Vane, is also a hybrid author. She's an award winning author who pens smart and sexy romance from historical to contemporary. Her Devil Devere series is self-published under her Vane Publishing LLC. And get ready for some Hot Cowboy Nights as Victoria also has a new series releasing from Sourcebooks, the first book being SLOW HAND, set to release November 2014.

When you take a look around, you'll find plenty of other examples, some that may have been around for quite a while. "Hybrid author" is just a term, a way to reference, to categorize. The authors, themselves, are just authors, plain and simple. They're storytellers embracing the traditional and Indie paths. We, the readers, just happen to be the benefactors. I, for one, am glad for it.

27 comments:

  1. Yes, it's so awesome how authors can be hybrid and just have more options for getting their books published. I'm glad for it too.

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    1. I agree. Having and embracing options is wonderful.

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  2. Hi Angela, I think hybrid is a smart business move for most authors these days. Hope you are doing well!

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  3. You're right Brinda. It's a very smart business move. I am doing very well, thank you :-) Hoping the same for you.

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  4. Nice feature, Angela.
    I 'met' Susan Quinn on YALITCHAT a long time ago, and she's great at social media. She always replies to tweets, contests, etc. Very versatile hybrid writer.

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    1. Susan is definitely a success in what she's pursuing :-)

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  5. I didn't know there was an actual definition. Good to know.

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    1. I heard the reference a while back and really thought of how much it's a good thing that writers can and do use both paths to bring their dreams to fruition.

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  6. The most successful hybrid author I know is Elizabeth S. Craig. I couldn't even tell you how many books she's had published both ways.

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  7. Yay to hybrids! I'm one too, having published with Big 6s, small presses and indie pubbed. It's all good.

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  8. I love the fact that we are now given plenty of choices. I love how the times are changing!

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    1. And as the times change, it's good to adapt with them.

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  9. The readers are the true winners here. Hurrah for the hybrids!

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  10. Truly believe it's the way of the future. And I think it's very book/story specific as well. Certain things will do better indie and the opposite is true. It's about finding the best home for your story, and reaching the most readers. It's not about right, wrong, good, or bad.

    These ladies are rocking the concept. :)

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    1. Yep, doing what works for them, as each author should :-)

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  11. I totally agree, Sheena-Kay! Woot!

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  12. A well-timed post. I'm interviewing Donna Hosie about this subject in a couple of weeks.

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  13. If you ask me, that's the best way to go--hitting all audiences and building a unique readership. I applaud the ladies who have breached the gap.

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    1. True, Crystal. What's better is there are so many others. My examples just scratch the surface :-)

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  14. As a business move, it's the smart way to go, but I'll be glad for the day when publishers view us without the labels of how we were published.

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    1. Hear, Hear. You're a hybrid author as well, Maria. So I know you're speaking from experience :-)

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  15. Guess I'm a hybrid. I sold two YA's to traditional publisher, then self-published an MG. This business is changing so quickly that it's hard to figure out what I am. Wait! I'm a writer. That' s what I am!

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    1. That's right, C Lee. Whatever path you've taken or paths, since you are a hybrid author, you are a writer, plain and simple :-)

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  16. I'm not sure we need the label but it does illustrate what a great time it is to be a writer. There are so many avenues toward publishing available. Plus from a business standpoint, you don't want to have all your eggs in one basket :) Thanks for pointing out a couple names I haven't read before!

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Comments are welcome.